Dubai’s autonomous flying taxis will take flight later this year

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The crafts are fully electric, with 18 rotors and nine independent battery systems that can pick up the slack to keep the craft in the air if anything fails mid-flight. Volocopter claims the quick-charge battery can be fully juiced in as little as 40 minutes for a max flight time of about 30 minutes. That’s at the standard cruising speed of 50 km/h (around 30 mph) and a top speed of 100 km/h (about 62 mph).

Source: Dubai’s autonomous flying taxis will take flight later this year

Life-Saving Drones Can Beat Ambulances to Heart Attack Victims

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Drones are becoming a ubiquitous technology with their increasing capabilities. Amazon is using them to deliver packages, Japanese innovators have created pollinator drones, and drones are even being used as backup dancers for pop stars. There are even drones emerging that could help to save lives.One such drone is being developed by Flypulse, a Swedish startup working on an autonomous drone that can bring life-saving equipment to the scene of a medical emergency. Its has the ability to deliver Automated External Defibrillators (AED) at an incredible speed — four times faster than an ambulance.

Source: Life-Saving Drones Can Beat Ambulances to Heart Attack Victims

Meet the Eyeborg: The Filmmaker With a Video Camera In His Right Eye Socket

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While the word “cyborg” is still more closely aligned with science-fiction, more and more people are augmenting their bodies with technology. Many of these augmentations correct limitations, like this Star Wars inspired prosthetic arm, or these exoskeletons designed to give paralyzed people improved functionality. However, the next wave of available augmentations could focus on enhancing human capabilities, both physically and cognitively, beyond what is biologically possible. Tech wizards like Elon Musk and Bryan Johnson are working on systems that would integrate the human brain with computers, making the subject smarter.

Source: Meet the Eyeborg: The Filmmaker With a Video Camera In His Right Eye Socket

A new DARPA project wants to show you how AI thinks

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nce we trust decision making processes driving AI systems, it’ll be easier to accept its more blatant applications in our everyday lives. Then, we might even feel better about the potential longer term ramifications of the tech, like when it takes our jobs and overthrows human society.

Source: A new DARPA project wants to show you how AI thinks

Ray Kurzweil’s Most Exciting Predictions About the Future of Humanity

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Kurzweil continues to share his visions for the future, and his latest prediction was made at the most recent SXSW Conference, where he claimed that the Singularity — the moment when technology becomes smarter than humans — will happen by 2045. Sixteen years prior to that, it will be just as smart as us. As he told Futurism, “2029 is the consistent date I have predicted for when an AI will pass a valid Turing test and therefore achieve human levels of intelligence.”

Source: Ray Kurzweil’s Most Exciting Predictions About the Future of Humanity

Megabots’ giant American fighting robot beats up a Toyota Prius

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This 12-ton, US$2.5-million beast is piloted by two people – one in charge of driving and one in charge of the fighty parts. Its Howe & Howe tank-tracked base and hydraulically actuated limbs are powered by a meaty 6.2-liter, 430-hp Corvette LS3 V8 engine.

Source: Megabots’ giant American fighting robot beats up a Toyota Prius

Japan turning to robots because there’s not enough humans around | Robotics & Automation News

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Desperate to overcome Japan’s growing shortage of labour, mid-sized companies are planning to buy robots and other equipment to automate a wide range of tasks, including manufacturing, earthmoving and hotel room service.According to a Bank of Japan survey, companies with share capital of 100 million yen to 1 billion yen plan to boost investment in the fiscal year that started in April by 17.5 percent, the highest level on record.

Source: Japan turning to robots because there’s not enough humans around | Robotics & Automation News