Grids of the Future: Villages Embracing 4th Industrial Revolution Faster than Cities – Renewable Energy World

Standard

They are moving communities away from kerosene (Pre-industrial Revolution) to the technology of the 4th Industrial Revolution using decentralized microgrids to power up their houses with the latest LED lighting technology.
Compared to cities, the villages are technologically more advanced than their urban counterparts. Utilizing direct current, the villagers are able to generate with a small solar panel and battery, enough energy to power up 10 LED lights, one street light, one LED TV, two fans and mobile charging points. And this load is less than a single tubelight that is shining in a New York subway station. To compare, a single tubelight is lighting up a small area in the subway station, whereas the villager in Himalayas is lighting up her entire house with six to eight rooms and the streets outside with the same energy consumption. Don’t be surprised if a villager says that she has more advanced lighting than a New Yorker.

via Grids of the Future: Villages Embracing 4th Industrial Revolution Faster than Cities – Renewable Energy World

Advertisements

Tesla’s first Puerto Rico battery project is a microgrid at a children’s hospital | Utility Dive

Standard

Tesla announced on Twitter yesterday that the company’s first project as part of recovery efforts in Puerto Rico is a solar-plus-storage project at Hospital del Niño, a children’s hospital on the island. The tweet included several images and said the project was “going live.”Small renewable energy and battery-based projects are being deployed on the island while simultaneously efforts continue to rebuild the traditional grid. Since Hurricane Maria hit last month, diesel generators have been the only source of power for many. Tesla has also delayed an event to show off its electric semi truck, pushing the reveal back until next month while it focuses on restoring power in Puerto Rico.

Source: Tesla’s first Puerto Rico battery project is a microgrid at a children’s hospital | Utility Dive

Will Solar, Storage Arrival In Puerto Rico Be a Breakthrough? – Renewable Energy World

Standard

The U.S. solar industry is about to airlift rooftop solar panels and batteries to Puerto Rico, where more than 90 percent of homes and businesses remain without electricity after Hurricane Maria destroyed the grid. The first plane of supplies is set to leave this week.It’s primarily a humanitarian effort, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. But it’s also a chance for the industry to showcase what it can offer that conventional power plants and grids can’t: an energy source capable of weathering natural disasters. And Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello, leader of an island wrecked by back-to-back storms, is all ears.After Elon Musk suggested on Twitter Thursday that Tesla Inc. could rebuild Puerto Rico’s electricity system with solar panels and batteries, Rossello responded: “Let’s talk.”Renewable-energy advocates have wasted no time in promoting solar and batteries as a solution for regions wrecked by hurricanes Irma and Maria. Tesla Inc. said it would send hundreds of battery systems to Puerto Rico that could be paired with rooftop panels. Edward Fenster, chairman of solar-panel provider Sunrun Inc. said it’s also looking to help in restoration efforts. The storms knocked out power to millions of utility customers who depend largely on fossil-fuel plants and long-distance transmission lines for service. Some in Puerto Rico may be in the dark for as long as a year as the grid’s repaired.SPONSORED CONTENT BY Solar Reviews ? Pegging the All-In, Installed Cost of a Tesla Powerwall 2Then Apple CEO Steve Jobs opened the doors to what has turned out to be a vast, new global retail market for smartphones and mobile/wireless telecommunications when he introduced the first touchscreen iPhone to the world in January 2007.Brought To You By“We build solar panels to withstand 150-mile-an-hour winds — if the roof stays on your house, the solar panels stay on your roof,” Sunrun’s Fenster said in an interview at Bloomberg’s San Francisco office Thursday. “And batteries are real-life safety equipment. From a broad perspective, solar and storage can strengthen grids everywhere

Source: Will Solar, Storage Arrival In Puerto Rico Be a Breakthrough? – Renewable Energy World

Elon Musk Offers to Help Puerto Rico Rebuild With Solar Power – ExtremeTech

Standard

Elon Musk has now offered to help Puerto Rico out, possibly by deploying solar power around the island. Puerto Rico is ideally situated for solar power in many respects. It’s relatively close to the equator–closer than any location in the continental United States–and it enjoys high amounts of sunshine for most of the year. Musk’s company, SolarCity, has been absorbed by Tesla and has been looking for ways to scale its battery projects to more customers. Puerto Rico, with its 3.5 million inhabitants, would be an enormous lift for Tesla, possibly more than the company can really handle at this point. Tesla’s similar efforts in American Samoa extended solar power and battery storage to an island with roughly 1,000 inhabitants. Puerto Rico has a population more than 1,000 times larger.

Source: Elon Musk Offers to Help Puerto Rico Rebuild With Solar Power – ExtremeTech

Solar Energy Just Cleared a Pricing Target Set for 2020

Standard

The Department of Energy (DOE) has announced that utility-grade solar panels have now reached cost targets that were set for 2020. The SunShot Initiative was established in 2011, and sought to bring the price of solar energy down to six cents per kilowatt-hour.That price goal has now been reached in Kansas City, Missouri, which the department uses as an indicator of prices around the country. It’s cheap to produce solar energy in a place like Phoenix, Arizona because there’s plenty of sunlight and open space, whereas it’s more expensive in a state like New York — Kansas City is a useful middle ground

Source: Solar Energy Just Cleared a Pricing Target Set for 2020