Monumental Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet arrives at Pebble Beach

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In many ways, the 2017 Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet is a continuation concept, taking the Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Coupé presented at Pebble Beach in 2016 and removing the top. It is the same 750 hp electric car as last year, with fearsome acceleration and a range of 500 kilometers (311 mi) but visually, the car achieves so much more. The end result was on show yesterday at Pebble Beach 2017, and as can be seen, it is far grander than most roadsters could hope for.

Source: Monumental Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet arrives at Pebble Beach

Volkswagen’s I.D. Buzz autonomous electric Kombi van gets production nod

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That was a pity, because the I.D. Buzz had some interesting ideas in it, like an augmented reality HUD, laser-guided self driving capability, video cameras instead of mirrors, and the ability to remove both the dash (as an infotainment tablet) and the car audio system (for outdoor tunes when you get to the beach). But it now seems the I.D. Buzz is headed for production, as Volkswagen announced over the weekend at Monterey Car Week that it’ll go on sale as a modified production version in 2022, targeted mainly at the US, Europe and China.

Source: Volkswagen’s I.D. Buzz autonomous electric Kombi van gets production nod

Ford Patent Tips Cars With Optional Steering Wheel/Pedals | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

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Ford is clearly thinking about these questions and coming up with answers. This is highlighted by a newly published patent the company filed describing a removable steering wheel and pedals meant for self-driving cars. The patent describes a system that allows both the steering wheel and the pedals to be attached or removed using a series of locking points.

Source: Ford Patent Tips Cars With Optional Steering Wheel/Pedals | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Autonomous car survey: Public is confused about current features

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More than half of the 1,000 new car buyers surveyed indicated that they expected to own an autonomous vehicle within the next 10 years. But at the same time, a majority of those surveyed were unaware of advanced driving assistance features available now, acceptance of which will be crucial to overcoming driver concerns on control and technology, and accelerate the path to fully automated driving.

Source: Autonomous car survey: Public is confused about current features

Autonomous Cars vs Human Drivers | Automobile Magazine

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But it won’t get far. Once Level 5 cars become a reality, it will take human drivers all of five minutes to figure out how they work. And from that moment, autonomous cars will be toast.As soon as the robot-driven car begins to move past the stop sign, a human driver will jump ahead into the intersection—knowing full well the Level 5 car is programmed to play nice and prevent a crash at all costs. And then the next human-driven car will leap out and the next and the next and the next. Maybe in five hours—but possibly not until, oh, 2029—traffic will clear enough for the Level 5 car to move forward without a human-guided vehicle in its path. And if you think that’s bad, wait until an early Level 5 car tries to merge into the wall of weaponized steel that is a human-centric rush hour on something such as California’s terminally overcrowded Interstate 405. Freeway designers might want to start thinking about adding special “forever-on ramps” for all the Level 5 cars that won’t be going any farther.

Source: Autonomous Cars vs Human Drivers | Automobile Magazine

Tesla’s self-driving claims might have been overblown

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The new system adds even more computing power for self-driving functionality as Tesla aims to achieve Level 5 autonomy (full self-driving without human interaction) in the near future. Musk is so confident about the development that he’s promised that Tesla will conduct the first coast-to-coast driverless journey before the end of 2017.

Source: Tesla’s self-driving claims might have been overblown